180102 Orin Hatch Retires from Senate

Romney Reek

Top Republican Orrin Hatch tweets that he’s ‘grateful’ for editorial that said he had an ‘unquenchable thirst for power’

Business Insider December 26, 2017
Orrin Hatch
  • Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah highlighted that he was named The Salt Lake Tribune’s “Utahn of the Year,” tweeting that he was “grateful” for the honor.
  • But the editorial said he had an “utter lack of integrity” and called on him to not seek office again in 2018.

Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah tweeted Monday night that he was “grateful” for the honor of being named The Salt Lake Tribune’s Utahn of the Year.

“Grateful for this great Christmas honor from the Salt Lake Tribune,” Hatch tweeted. “For the record, I voted for @SpencerJCox and @rudygobert27.”

The chairman of the Senate Finance Committee followed up his tweet with one highlighting another editorial from the publication praising tax reform.

While on the surface that honor would seem to be one worth highlighting for the senator, a quick read of the Tribune’s editorial shows that the publication did not bestow him with the recognition for positive reasons.

“These things are often misunderstood,” the editorial began. “So, lest our readers, or the honoree himself, get the wrong impression, let us repeat the idea behind The Salt Lake Tribune’s Utahn of the Year designation. The criteria are not set in stone. But this year, as many times in the past, The Tribune has assigned the label to the Utahn who, over the past 12 months, has done the most. Has made the most news. Has had the biggest impact. For good or for ill.”

As reasons Hatch was chosen, The Tribune cited “his utter lack of integrity that rises from his unquenchable thirst for power” and what it called an “anti-environmental, anti-Native American and, yes, anti-business” move to scale back two major national monuments in the state.

Though the publication wrote of Hatch’s major role in passing Republicans’ tax overhaul in a more positive light, the editorial board wrote that the legislation’s passage was all the more reason for him to retire from office after serving for more than 40 years.

“But perhaps the most significant move of Hatch’s career is the one that should, if there is any justice, end it,” the board wrote. “The last time the senator was up for re-election, in 2012, he promised that it would be his last campaign. That was enough for many likely successors, of both parties, to stand down, to let the elder statesman have his victory tour and to prepare to run for an open seat in 2018.

“Clearly, it was a lie,” the board continued. “Over the years, Hatch stared down a generation or two of highly qualified political leaders who were fully qualified to take his place, Hatch is now moving to run for another term — it would be his eighth — in the Senate. Once again, Hatch has moved to freeze the field to make it nigh unto impossible for any number of would-be senators to so much as mount a credible challenge. That’s not only not fair to all of those who were passed over. It is basically a theft from the Utah electorate.”

Hatch’s office told Business Insider that the senator’s original tweet “was very tongue-in-cheek,” noting that the publication had expressed similar sentiment on multiple occassions in recent years

“Everyone celebrates Christmas differently,” Matt Whitlock, Hatch’s communications director, told Business Insider. “We all sincerely hope the members of the Salt Lake Tribune editorial board find joy this holiday season in something beyond baselessly attacking the service and integrity of someone who given 40 years for the people of Utah, and served as one of the most effective lawmakers of all time, just to satisfy their unquenchable thirst for clicks.”

Twitter, however, was still quick to jump on Hatch for the tweet:

Um, they said you’re a corrupt, power-hungry liar who should step down, did you not actually read the editorial? https://twitter.com/OrrinHatch/status/945375067927490560 

LOL, dude didn’t read the article. Part of their reasoning for picking him is: “His utter lack of integrity that rises from his unquenchable thirst for power.” http://www.sltrib.com/opinion/editorial/2017/12/25/tribune-editorial-why-orrin-hatch-is-utahn-of-the-year/ https://twitter.com/OrrinHatch/status/945375067927490560 

Tribune Editorial: Why Orrin Hatch is Utahn of the Year

These things are often misunderstood. So, lest our readers, or the honoree himself, get the wrong impression, let us repeat the idea behind The Salt Lake Tribune’s Utahn of the Year designation.

sltrib.com

lmaooo he still hasn’t deleted this, looks like he read this as thoroughly as he read his tax bill before voting on it https://twitter.com/OrrinHatch/status/945375067927490560 

Either Orrin Hatch didn’t read the article or he was fine with sentences like this one: “His utter lack of integrity that rises from his unquenchable thirst for power.” https://twitter.com/OrrinHatch/status/945375067927490560 

This is very, very funny. Read the article Hatch thinks is an “honor.” Oh, boy. Guess he read this article as closely as GOP senators read the tax bill before voting for it.http://www.sltrib.com/opinion/editorial/2017/12/25/tribune-editorial-why-orrin-hatch-is-utahn-of-the-year/  https://twitter.com/OrrinHatch/status/945375067927490560 

Tribune Editorial: Why Orrin Hatch is Utahn of the Year

1997stood. So, lest our readers, or the honoree himself, get the wrong impression, let us repeat the idea behind The Salt Lake Tribune’s Utahn of the Year designation.

sltrib.com

This post has been updated to include comment from Hatch’s office.

For his role in the shrinking of Bears Ears and the passage of a tax bill, Sen. Orrin Hatch is The Tribune’s Utahn of the Year

The Salt Lake Tribune Thomas Burr December 25, 2017

(J. Scott Applewhite | AP Photo) Reporters ask questions of Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, chairman of the tax-writing Finance Committee, as he walks to meet with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., on the GOP effort to overhaul the tax code, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Dec. 1, 2017.

(AndrŽ Chung | special to The Salt Lake Tribune) Sen. Hatch in the Senate pro tem office in Washington D.C. on December 21, 2017 with an original portrait of President Lincoln on the wall. This is the same painting that Lincoln actually sat for and is the basis for the penny. Senator Orrin Hatch is the senior senator from Utah, Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee and President pro tempore of the United States Senate.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Utah Senator Orrin Hatch answers questions about the phone call he had just taken from President Donald Trump telling him he would approve a recommendation to trim the boundaries of the Bears Ears National Monument on Friday, Oct. 27, 2017.

Washington • Love him or hate him, Sen. Orrin Hatch racked up big wins in 2017 on long-promised Republican goals of overhauling the U.S. tax code, erasing Obamacare’s individual mandate and gutting two sprawling national monuments that angered many southern Utahns and Hatch’s conservative base.

President Donald Trump even took a day — during a time when the tax overhaul, North Korea and other pressing matters were on his plate — to fly to Utah to announce the sweeping changes to Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments.

“You are a true fighter, Orrin,” Trump declared in Utah’s Capitol. “And I have to say, I’ve gotten to know him very well. … He’s a fighter. We hope you will continue to serve your state and your country in the Senate for a very long time to come.”

Hatch, serving his 40th year in the Senate, has yet to say whether he’ll seek what would be an unprecedented-for-Utah eighth term in 2018, but he has trumpeted his position as Senate president pro tempore — third in line for the presidency — as well as his perch as chairman of the Senate Finance Committee.

He’s had the ear of the president, and not many in Congress can say that, even as his Senate actions have earned a strong rebuke among Democrats and independents who used to count on the Utah senator as a bipartisan dealmaker. Three-quarters of Utahns don’t want him to run again, and, at 83, his age has raised questions about his ability to continue doing the job.

Still, there is no question that Hatch has been a key player in shaping the new administration’s impacts on the nation and Utah. Arguably, the senator has never wielded more clout. And in recognition of the singular role he has played in many of the major news stories this year, The Salt Lake Tribune has named Hatch as the 2017 Utahn of the Year.

(AndrŽ Chung | special to The Salt Lake Tribune) Senator Orrin Hatch is the senior senator from Utah, Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee and President pro tempore of the United States Senate.
(AndrŽ Chung | special to The Salt Lake Tribune) Senator Orrin Hatch is the senior senator from Utah, Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee and President pro tempore of the United States Senate.

“It’s been a very good year for the senator and a good year for the state of Utah,” said Boyd Matheson, president of the conservative Utah-based Sutherland Institute. “In terms of a positive, proactive year, he probably hasn’t had that kind of year in a long while.”

Hatch says he’s had pretty good years before, but, “This is pretty hard to beat, I have to admit.”

“I feel really blessed,” he said in an interview last week. “I really do. I feel like I’ve done what I’m supposed to do. I think I’ve put Utah on the map, to a large degree. Not that it wasn’t, but it’s a bit more. Utah hasn’t been left behind as far as I can see.”

Although decried by American Indian tribes, environmentalists, Democrats and a significant portion of Utahns, Hatch’s efforts to get Trump to severely shrink the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase monuments underscored his power in Washington.

Though public lands issues had been virtually invisible from Trump’s campaign and the White House agenda, the president flew some nine hours round trip to Utah in early December and spent less than 2½ hours on the ground to make the announcement. While in the state, he met with leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, with Hatch as his escort. When he signed the monument proclamations, Trump handed Hatch the first pen he used.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) U.S. President Donald Trump, surrounded by Utah representatives looks at Sen. Orrin Hatch to give him the pen used to signs a presidential proclamation to shrink Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments at the Utah Capitol on Monday, Dec. 4, 2017.
(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) U.S. President Donald Trump, surrounded by Utah representatives looks at Sen. Orrin Hatch to give him the pen used to signs a presidential proclamation to shrink Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments at the Utah Capitol on Monday, Dec. 4, 2017.

“I’m approving the Bears Ears recommendation for you, Orrin,” the president told the senator in a November call.

The two heaped praise on each other at the Utah Capitol but it was not nearly as much of a love fest as when Trump invited members of Congress to the White House on Dec. 20 to celebrate the passage of the first major overhaul of the tax code in three decades — the president’s first significant legislative win. Hatch called him a “heckuva leader” and said Trump may become the best president in U.S. history. In turn, Trump said Hatch was a “special friend.” The two speak frequently, Hatch’s office says, and the senator notes the president always picks up when he calls.

Trump has also made no secret that he wants Hatch to run for another term, a decision that the senator says he’ll make soon.

Will he or won’t he?

Hatch had promised his 2012 campaign would be his last. It may not be.

The senator has kept Utah in suspense all year, wavering between saying he’ll seek re-election and then saying he might hang it up. The answer seemingly depends on his mood.

Hatch had said he would like to stick around if he was close to getting tax reform passed, and now that it has, he’s still contemplating another bid.

“My wife [Elaine] would like me to hang it up,” he said last week. But, he quickly added, “I have a lot of pressure to keep going, from the president right on down, my colleagues here in the Senate. … It’s a little too early to say.”

The endless speculation has sparked some consternation among Utah politicos and potential candidates who are stuck waiting to see if the path to the seat is open or if Hatch will engage his immense campaign account and political machine to seek an eighth term.

He added more fuel to the speculation earlier in the year when he said he would step aside if former presidential candidate Mitt Romney wanted to run. Romney has reportedly said he’s interested, a development that sparked national headlines and concern from the White House, which does not hold Romney, a vocal critic of Trump, in high regard.

Hatch’s decision looms over the Utah political scene, because prominent figures beyond Romney, such as Reps. Chris Stewart and Mia Love, might consider a Senate run if Hatch decides to retire.

Hatch plans to speak with his family over the holidays about whether he’ll run, but he’s offered up several reasons why he should, starting with his chairmanship of the Senate Finance Committee that would oversee any potential changes to Medicare and Social Security, as well as his sway on the Judiciary Committee.

Hatch was a front-line cheerleader for getting Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch, confirmed and has also touted the Senate’s ability to get 12 circuit court judges approved this year (more by far than any other president in his first year) and a score of district judges on the bench.

Lightning rod

Hatch and his fellow Republican senators earned a strong rebuke from Democrats over the Gorsuch nomination. The GOP majority had held the Supreme Court seat open for a year after the death of Antonin Scalia, preventing then-President Barack Obama from filling it with his pick, Merrick Garland.

And that wasn’t the only time Hatch was in the crosshairs.

An investigation by The Washington Post and CBS’ “60 Minutes”found that a law, which Hatch played a key role in, helped fuel the opioid crisis across the country by hamstringing the Drug Enforcement Administration from cracking down on large-scale shipments of the drug.

Last year, more than 63,600 Americans died of overdoses, according to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“The law was the crowning achievement of a multifaceted campaign by the drug industry to weaken aggressive DEA enforcement efforts against drug distribution companies that were supplying corrupt doctors and pharmacists who peddled narcotics to the black market,” the investigation found. “The industry worked behind the scenes with lobbyists and key members of Congress, pouring more than a million dollars into their election campaigns.”

Political action committees tied to the pharmaceutical industry funneled $177,000 to Hatch’s campaigns during the time the law was being pushed through.

Hatch pushed back, noting the DEA had not objected to the bill and alleging the report was an attempt to smear Rep. Tom Marino, R-Pa., who had sponsored the bill and was the nominee to be the nation’s drug czar.

Soon after the report was published and broadcast, Marino withdrew his nomination.

Democrats also blasted Hatch for pushing through the tax bill without more congressional hearings, which was largely written by the majority party and held secret until hours before votes. It was the same for the failed plans to jettison the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

During one contentious hearing earlier this year, Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., grilled Hatch about whether there would be hearings on the health care bill, catching the Utah senator off guard.

“I think we’ve already had one, but …” Hatch said, trailing off as an aide came to his side. Hatch conferred with his assistant for a few seconds and then repeated her comments.

It got even more heated when Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, said the GOP tax bill would just mean the “rich getting richer” off the backs of the poor.

“I come from the poor people, and I have been here working my whole stinkin’ career for people who don’t have a chance, and I really resent anybody that says I’m doing it for the rich,” Hatch responded, clearly enraged. “Give me a break. I think you guys overplay all the time, and it gets old. And, frankly, you ought to quit it. … So don’t spew that stuff on me. I get a little tired of that crap.”

Hatch also defended his health this year, arguing that he feels his age a bit more but that nothing is stopping him. A physician’s report on his health found he was in relatively good shape for his age.

Washington Post story in December focused on Hatch and two other elder senators in noting that the Senate was now the oldest in history with eight octogenarians currently serving, nearly twice as many as ever.

Don Ritchie, the longtime Senate historian who is now an emeritus with the office, says Hatch has always been notable for his efforts to work across the aisle, especially when he made deals with Sen. Ted Kennedy, D-Mass. And all of his years of experience carry weight.

“‘Senate’ comes from the same Latin root as seniority,” Ritchie said, “and there are definitely rewards for longevity.”

Hatch’s 2017 was clearly noteworthy, and he’ll be a major player in 2018 as well, not just because of the campaign for his seat, but also because of the role he is poised to play in Washington, as Trump looks to renegotiate trade deals, pass an infrastructure spending bill, modify, if not kill, the Affordable Care Act, create new immigration policies and potentially alter Medicaid and Social Security.

Editor’s note: Thomas Burr, The Tribune’s Washington bureau chief, did not play any role in the decision to name Hatch as the newspaper’s Utahn of the Year.

Past Utahn of the Year winners
  • 2016 — Madi Barney, whose advocacy encouraged BYU to create an Honor Code amnesty policy for students who report that they were sexually assaulted
  • 2015 — Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes
  • 2014 — Same-sex marriage plaintiffs
  • 2013 — Salt Lake County Attorney Sim Gill
  • 2012 — Mormons Building Bridges
  • 2011 — Salt Lake City Police Chief Chris Burbank
  • 2010 — Elizabeth, Lois and Mary Smart
  • 2009 — Elizabeth Smart
  • 2008 — Larry Miller
  • 2007 — First responders to tragedies including the Trolley Square shooting rampage and the Crandell Canyon Mine disaster
  • 2006 — Latino leaders Jorge Fierro, Andrew Valdez, Ruby Chacon and Alma Armendariz
  • 2005 — Pamela Atkinson, advocate for the poor
  • 2004 — Utahns killed in Iraq and Afghanistan
  • 2003 — Gov. Olene Walker
  • 2002 — LDS Church President Gordon B. Hinckley
  • 2001 — Winter Games organizer Mitt Romney
  • 2000 — Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson
  • 1999 — The letter that sparked the Olympic bribery scandal
  • 1998 — Mary Ann Kingston, who suffered a brutal beating after escaping plural marriage
  • 1997 — NBA MVP Karl Malone

Tribune Editorial: Why Orrin Hatch is Utahn of the Year

The Salt Lake Tribune  December 25, 2017

These things are often misunderstood. So, lest our readers, or the honoree himself, get the wrong impression, let us repeat the idea behind The Salt Lake Tribune’s Utahn of the Year designation.

The criteria are not set in stone. But this year, as many times in the past, The Tribune has assigned the label to the Utahn who, over the past 12 months, has done the most. Has made the most news. Has had the biggest impact. For good or for ill.

The selection of Sen. Orrin G. Hatch as the 2017 Utahn of the Year has little to do with the fact that, after 42 years, he is the longest-serving Republican senator in U.S. history, that he has been a senator from Utah longer than three-fifths of the state’s population has been alive.

It has everything to do with recognizing:

  • Hatch’s part in the dramatic dismantling of the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments.
  • His role as chairman of the Senate Finance Committee in passing a major overhaul of the nation’s tax code.
  • His utter lack of integrity that rises from his unquenchable thirst for power.

Each of these actions stands to impact the lives of every Utahn, now and for years to come. Whether those Utahns approve or disapprove of those actions has little consequence in this specific recognition. Only the breadth and depth of their significance matters.

As has been argued in this space before, the presidential decision to cut the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in half and to slash the size of the brand new Bears Ears National Monument by some 90 percent has no constitutional, legal or environmental logic.

To all appearances — appearances promoted by Hatch — this anti-environmental, anti-Native American and, yes, anti-business decommissioning of national monuments was basically a political favor the White House did for Hatch. A favor done in return for Hatch’s support of the president generally and of his tax reform plan in particular.

And, on the subject of tax reform: For a very long time indeed, Hatch has said that his desire to stick around long enough to have a say in what indeed would be a long-overdue overhaul of the nation’s Byzantine tax code is the primary reason he has run for re-election time after time.

Last week, he did it.

The tax bill that passed the House and the Senate and was signed into law by the president Friday is being praised for bringing corporate tax rates in line with the nation’s post-industrial competitors and otherwise benefiting corporations and investors in a way that backers see as a boost to the economy, even as opponents vilify it for favoring the rich and adding to the federal budget deficit.

No matter who turns out to be right about that argument, the fact remains that tax reform has been talked about and talked about for decades and only now has anything been done. And Hatch, as chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, has his fingerprints all over it.

But perhaps the most significant move of Hatch’s career is the one that should, if there is any justice, end it.

The last time the senator was up for re-election, in 2012, he promised that it would be his last campaign. That was enough for many likely successors, of both parties, to stand down, to let the elder statesman have his victory tour and to prepare to run for an open seat in 2018.

Clearly, it was a lie. Over the years, Hatch stared down a generation or two of highly qualified political leaders who were fully qualified to take his place, Hatch is now moving to run for another term — it would be his eighth — in the Senate. Once again, Hatch has moved to freeze the field to make it nigh unto impossible for any number of would-be senators to so much as mount a credible challenge. That’s not only not fair to all of those who were passed over. It is basically a theft from the Utah electorate.

It would be good for Utah if Hatch, having finally caught the Great White Whale of tax reform, were to call it a career. If he doesn’t, the voters should end it for him.

Common is the repetition of the catchphrase that Hatch successfully used to push aside three-term Sen. Frank Moss in this first election in, egad, 1976.

“What do you call a senator who’s served in office for 18 years? You call him home.”

Less well known is a bit of advice Hatch gave to Capitol Hill interns in 1983.

“You should not fall in love with D.C.” he admonished them. “Elected politicians shouldn’t stay here too long.”

If only he had listened to his own advice.

Hatch office dismisses scathing Tribune editorial as click bait

The Salt Lake Tribune   Dan Harrie   December 28, 2017

Spokesman denounces baseless attack on ‘one of the most effective lawmakers of all time.’

Hatch office dismisses scathing Tribune editorial as click bait

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Utah Senator Orrin Hatch answers questions about the phone call he had just taken from President Donald Trump telling him he would approve a recommendation to trim the boundaries of the Bears Ears National Monument on Friday, Oct. 27, 2017.

Sen. Orrin Hatch’s office responded to a scathing Salt Lake Tribune editorial by dismissing it as a baseless attack meant only to attract clicks to its website.

“Everyone celebrates Christmas differently,” said Hatch spokesman Matt Whitlock in a statement. “We all sincerely hope the members of The Salt Lake Tribune editorial board find joy this holiday season in something beyond baselessly attacking the service and integrity of someone who [has] given 40 years for the people of Utah, and served as one of the most effective lawmakers of all time just to satisfy their unquenchable thirst for clicks.”

If anyone is looking for a response to the Tribune’s Christmas editorial on Hatch, here you go. pic.twitter.com/prdQkl0iha

View image on Twitter

The newspaper’s editorial, published Sunday, offered an explanation for the senator’s selection as the Tribune’s “Utahn of the Year.” Saying the designation was intended to single out the newsmaker who had “done the most … for good or for ill,” the editorial board clearly came down on the side of the latter.

It called out the seven-term Hatch for “his utter lack of integrity that rises from his unquenchable thirst for power.”

The editorial also urged — as it has several times previously — for him to hang it up after his current term. But it said he appears to have every intention of running next year, calling his promise in 2012 to make that his last campaign “a lie.”

Hatch, in a Christmas Day tweet, had said it was an honor to be named the newspaper’s Utahn of the Year and provided a picture of the print edition’s front page, which included a news story about the selection.

But a number of news outlets and online critics called out Hatch for referring to “the honor” of the Tribune’s designation as the editorial board was slamming him.


THINGS THAT MAKE YOU GO HMMMM: A List of Legislators LEAVING the U.S. CONGRESS and U.S. SENATE by Retiring, Running for Other Office, RESIGNING, or Not Running Again

Source for Senators   Senate.gov
Source for Congressional members   CNN
By Adam LevyWade Payson-Denney and Ashley Killough, CNN

Updated 2:58 PM ET, Mon December 4, 2017

Washington (CNN)This fall has seen a steady stream of Republican House members announcing their plans to resign, retire or run for another office.

As moderate Republican members Dave Reichert and Charlie Dent prepare to leave Congress, conservatives want stronger allies in their seats, while Democrats see an opportunity to flip them.

Democrats need to pick up 24 seats to retake the majority from Republicans, who’ve maintained control of the House since 2011.

The campaign committees on both sides are eying the 23 Republicans defending districts that Hillary Clinton won, and the 12 held by Democrats in districts that President Donald Trump won as vulnerable seats to flip.

While midterm elections are historically tough for the party of the President in power, it’s too early to tell how things will unfold next year.

US Representatives Leaving Congress

Retiring

Rep. Sam Johnson (R, TX-3) via press release on 1/6/17
Rep. Lynn Jenkins (R, KS-2); via Facebook post on 1/25/17
Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R, FL-27); told the Miami Herald on 4/30/17
Rep. John J. Duncan Jr. (R, TN-2); told local media on 7/31/17
Rep. Niki Tsongas (D, MA-3); via press release on 8/9/17
Rep. Dave Reichert (R, WA-9) via press release on 9/6/17
Rep. Charlie Dent (R, PA-15) via press release on 9/7/17
Rep. Dave Trott (R, MI-11), via press release on 9/11/17
Rep. Carol Shea-Porter (D, NH-1), via statement on 10/6/17
Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R, TX-5), via email to supporters on 10/31/2017
Rep. Lamar Smith (R, TX-21), via statement on 11/2/2017
Rep. Frank LoBiondo (R, NJ-2), via statement on 11/7/2017
Rep. Ted Poe (R, TX-2), via Facebook on 11/7/17
Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R, VA-6) via social media and statement on 11/9/17
Rep. Gene Green (D, TX-29) via local media on 11/13/17
Rep. Luis Gutiérrez (D, IL-4) at press conference on 11/28/17
Rep. Joe Barton (R, TX-6) to Dallas Morning News on 11/30/17
Rep. Sander Levin (D, MI-9) via Detroit Free Press on 12/2/17

Resigned or ResigningQmark Alarm 1 Thinks That Make You Go Hmmm

Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R, UT-3); left House on 6/30/17 to become a Fox News contributor (Republican Rep. Jim Curtis won the special election November 7 and was sworn in last month)

Rep. Tim Murphy (R, PA-18), announced via statement on 10/4/17, will leave on 10/21/17 (Special election TBA)

Rep. Pat Tiberi (R, OH-12), announced via statement on 10/19/17, will leave “by January 31, 2018” (Special election TBA)

Rep. John Conyers (D, MI), announced via talk news radio 12/05/17Jerk Thinks That Make You Go Hmmm

Running for Other Office

Running for President
Rep. John Delaney (D, MD-6); announced via The Washington Post on 7/31/17
Running for Governor
Rep. Kristi Noem (R, SD-AL); via YouTube on 11/14/16
Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D, NM-1); via Youtube on 12/13/16
Rep. James Renacci (R, OH-16); via campaign video on 3/20/17
Rep. Tim Walz (D, MN-1); via local newspaper on 3/27/17
Rep. Raul Labrador (R, ID-1); via local media on 5/9/17
Rep. Jared Polis (D, CO-2); told Denver Post on 6/11/17
Rep. Steve Pearce (R, NM-2); told Albuquerque Journal on 7/10/17
Rep. Diane Black (R, TN-6); via Facebook post on 8/2/17
Rep. Colleen Hanabusa (D, HI-1); via release on 9/1/17
Running for the Senate
Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D, TX-16); announced in El Paso on 3/31/17
Rep. Evan Jenkins (R, WV-3); via web video on 5/8/17
Rep. Jacky Rosen (D, NV-3); via The Nevada Independent on 7/5/17
Rep. Luke Messer (R, IN-6); via tweet on 7/26/17
Rep. Todd Rokita (R, IN-4); via YouTube on 8/9/17
Rep. Lou Barletta (R, PA-11); via campaign video on 8/29/17
Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D, AZ-9) via YouTube video on 9/28/17
Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R, TN-7), via online video 10/5/17

Senators Retiring or ResigningQmark Alarm 1 Thinks That Make You Go Hmmm

Senator Bob Corker (R-Tennessee), Retiring 2018
Senator Jeff Flake (R-Arizona), Retiring 2018
Senator Al Franken (D-Minnesota), announced Resignation 12/07/17
Senator John McCain (RINO-Arizona), suffering from a brain tumor due to a lack of adrenochrome and a guilty conscience due to how he gets his adrenochrome

Rats Jumping Ship USS Congress


BALLOTPEDIA’S List of U.S. Congress incumbents who are not running for re-election in 2018

Source   BALLOTPEDIA

This lists the incumbent members of the 115th U.S. Congress who are not running for re-election in the 2018 Congressional elections (both U.S. Senate and U.S. House).

U.S. Senate members
  • Democratic Party 0 Democrats
  • Republican Party 2 Republicans
Name: Party: Current office:
Bob Corker Ends.png Republican Tennessee
Jeff Flake Ends.png Republican Arizona
U.S. House members

As of December 10, 2017, a total of 36 representatives will not seek re-election to their U.S. House districts.

Party breakdown:
Democratic Party 13 Democratic members of the U.S. House
and
Republican Party 23 Republican members of the U.S. House

Incumbents retiring from public office
  • Democratic Party 6 Democrats
  • Republican Party 13 Republicans
Name: Party: Current office:
Bob Goodlatte Ends.png Republican Virginia, District 6
Carol Shea-Porter Electiondot.png Democratic New Hampshire, District 1
Charles W. Dent Ends.png Republican Pennsylvania, District 15
Dave Reichert Ends.png Republican Washington, District 8
David Trott Ends.png Republican Michigan, District 11
Frank LoBiondo Ends.png Republican New Jersey, District 2
Gene Green Electiondot.png Democratic Texas, District 29
Ileana Ros-Lehtinen Ends.png Republican Florida, District 27
Jeb Hensarling Ends.png Republican Texas, District 5
Joe Barton Ends.png Republican Texas, District 6
John Delaney Electiondot.png Democratic Maryland, District 6
John J. Duncan, Jr. Ends.png Republican Tennessee, District 2
Lamar Smith Ends.png Republican Texas, District 21
Luis V. Gutierrez Electiondot.png Democratic Illinois, District 4
Lynn Jenkins Ends.png Republican Kansas, District 2
Niki Tsongas Electiondot.png Democratic Massachusetts, District 3
Sam Johnson Ends.png Republican Texas, District 3
Sandy Levin Electiondot.png Democratic Michigan, District 9
Ted Poe Ends.png Republican Texas, District 2
Incumbents seeking other offices
U.S. House members seeking a seat in the U.S. Senate

Democratic Party 3 Democrats
Republican Party 5 Republicans

Name: Party: Current office:
Beto O’Rourke Electiondot.png Democratic Texas, District 16
Evan Jenkins Ends.png Republican West Virginia, District 3
Jacky Rosen Electiondot.png Democratic Nevada, District 3
Kyrsten Sinema Electiondot.png Democratic Arizona, District 9
Lou Barletta Ends.png Republican Pennsylvania, District 11
Luke Messer Ends.png Republican Indiana, District 6
Marsha Blackburn Ends.png Republican Tennessee, District 7
Todd Rokita Ends.png Republican Indiana, District 4
U.S. House members running for governor

Democratic Party 4 Democrats
Republican Party 5 Republicans

Name: Party: Current office:
Colleen Hanabusa Electiondot.png Democratic Hawaii, District 1
Diane Black Ends.png Republican Tennessee, District 6
Jared Polis Electiondot.png Democratic Colorado, District 2
James B. Renacci Ends.png Republican Ohio, District 16
Kristi L. Noem Ends.png Republican South Dakota, At-Large District
Michelle Lujan Grisham Electiondot.png Democratic New Mexico, District 1
Raul R. Labrador Ends.png Republican Idaho, District 1
Steve Pearce Ends.png Republican New Mexico, District 2
Tim Walz Electiondot.png Democratic Minnesota, District 1
Congressional incumbents who left office early or have announced upcoming resignations
Name: Party: Most recent office:
Al Franken Electiondot.png Democratic U.S. Senate, Minnesota
Jason Chaffetz Ends.png Republican U.S. House, Utah, District 3
Jeff Sessions Ends.png Republican U.S. Attorney General
John Conyers, Jr. Electiondot.png Democratic U.S. House, Michigan, District 13
Michael “Mick” Mulvaney Ends.png Republican Director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget
Mike Pompeo Ends.png Republican Director of the CIA
Patrick J. Tiberi Ends.png Republican U.S. House, Ohio, District 12
Ryan Zinke Ends.png Republican U.S. Secretary of the Interior
Tim Murphy Ends.png Republican U.S. House, Pennsylvania, District 18
Tom Price Ends.png Republican Former Secretary of Health and Human Services
Trent Franks Ends.png Republican U.S. House, Arizona, District 8
Xavier Becerra Electiondot.png Democratic Attorney General of California
See also

Some of the Most Legendary CEOs in Corporate America Are Retiring

There is a changing of the guard in Corporate America.

Source THE STREET

By Brian Sozzi   Dec 9, 2016 9:43 AM EST

Nothing lasts forever, even for seemingly invincible titans of Corporate America.

As we exit the old year, some of the biggest names and some of the most transformational CEOs around are handing over their coveted jobs to hand-picked successors. While these battled-tested Baby Boomer executives aren’t completely vanishing from their companies, the announcements do represent a changing of the guard to a new generation.

TheStreet takes a brief look at several CEO transitions underway.

Coca-Cola (KO)

The beverage giant is the latest to announce a transition in the corner office, saying Friday that long-time CEO Muhtar Kent will step down as CEO effective May 1, 2017. He will remain chairman. Taking over for Kent as CEO will be Chief Operating Officer James Quincey (who TheStreetrecently interviewed in the above video).

Warren Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.A) (BRK.B) and a long-time Coke shareholder, said, “As chairman and CEO, Muhtar has been an excellent steward of Coca-Cola’s business over the last eight years and I am thankful for the leadership he has provided to put in place the right vision, strategy and thoughtful succession plan for long-term success.” He added, “I know James and like him, and believe the company has made a smart investment in its future with his selection.”

As TheStreet reported back in August last year, the ascendance of Quincey, 51, to the CEO role was more likely than not given his global resume.

Quincey was promoted to the operating chief position in August 2015 from president of Coke’s European operations. At the time, Coke hadn’t had a COO since 2007, signifying the importance of Quincey’s promotion.

Quincey joined Coca-Cola in 1996 as a director in its Latin American group. From then until 2005, Quincey rose through the ranks in Coca-Cola’s Latin America operations, finishing up as president of Coke’s Mexico division. From October 2008 to January 2013, he served as president of Coke’s Northwest Europe and Nordics business unit before being appointed European president in 2013 as part of an organizational shakeup.

“I will focus on long-term strategy, developing robust talent and our innovation pipeline,” said Coca-Cola Chairman and CEO Muhtar Kent said in August 2015 in response to a question by TheStreeton how his day-to-day role would change with Quincey serving as COO. Kent’s comment, at the time, sounded more like a veteran executive readying to transition to a chairman role, handing off the baton to a worthy successor. As it turns out, that was the case.

Since then, Quincey has focused on Coke’s growth strategies, overseeing the execution of an ongoing billion-dollar restructuring plan, marketing and building out Coke’s portfolio of brands.

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